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that the economies matter. i think whether it's been leon panetta, bob gates, admiral mullen, the constant focus on economic feminism, i don't know canada's net position with china, but it does raise this fundamental question of whether american debt is an asset or a liability. you know, the conference in dallas yesterday were recently, where someone made a comment that an american source of power to every different in the past that it defies the pentagon and the size american debt that we're too big to fail. deadhorse lake bigger problem than us. i be interested when you're anything about policy do you look at that as a source of leverage or does it strain american options tremendous a? >> steve, very simply, the u.s. situation with respect to our deficit and debt is a national security liability. we need our senior leadership. we need a senior leadership to take it on. we have an opportunity to do so. we have a requirement to do so. at the foundation of national power is ultimately economic comment and in terms of global influence, in terms of the ability to support a military, the economic is
this country in an exceptional way. his famous bob dole and in russell, kansas who served in world war ii, was severely disabled, came home uncertain of their future but dedicated his life to public service. i don't know how many weeks to months or years i looked in bob dole's life, but he think the passage of this convention i on disabilities to place's work at the moment. we owe it to bob dole, two of the disabled him who stand with locked arms taking us to pass this convention. we ought to disabled people across america and around the world to stand up once again for the race of the disabled and for expanding opportunity. not just in america, but across the world. people say we are an exceptional nation. there's a little bit of egotism in that statement, but i believe it is. i ask for additional 30 seconds. i believe it is factual and america is an exceptional nation that said sorting the believe that freedom and liberty and opportunity should be for everyone within our country and around the world. today is our chance. let no minor argument over some minor political issues from focusi
? head to madmoney.cnbc.com. bob, these projections... they're... optimistic. productivity up, costs down, time to market reduced... those are good things. upstairs, they will see fantasy. not fantasy... logistics. ups came in, analyzed our supply chain, inventory systems... ups? ups. not fantasy? who would have thought? i did. we did, bob. we did. got it. >>> lately i've been getting a ton of calls about the printing business. no, i'm not talking about old-fashioned printers like the kind you buy from a dinosaur like hewlett-packard. i mean three-dimensional printers. these are machines that can rapidly design and produce functional three-dimensional parts and products. designers use them to whip up prototypes right in their offices instead of having to send out blueprints to an actual manufacturer. increasingly we're seeing them in strange places. dentist's office to make molds and bridges. and now i'm getting a lot of questions. is 3-d printing for real? and if so, what's the best way to play it? because "mad money" is the most interactive show on television i'm going to answer that qu
. representative howard berman elected in 1982 and served 30 years from the 28th district. representative bob filner sworn in this month as mayor of san diego and served for 20 years. representative laura richardson served for five years from the 37th district. representative pete stark, outgoing dean of our delegation was elected in 1972 and served more than 40 wreers from the 13th district. representative lynn woolsey served for 20 years from the 6th congressional district. much kk said about the distinguished careers of our departing colleagues, but i would like to offer a few remarks of the work i have joined them during their time here in the congress. representative howard berman has served the house for 30 years and i was honored to name him among my closest friends in this body. during his service, he worked on a wide of variety of issues and known as a champion of human rights and standing up for middle class, working class and for the poor in our country. as chair of the foreign affairs committee from 2007 to 2008, mr. berman made great progress on behalf of the less fortunate. he w
-minute appeal by former senator bob dole himself a disabled veteran, as well as every major veterans group and even the chamber of commerce could not sway senate republicans. but this is what has become of the republican party. a party whose views often dissend to the lowest common denominator and defined by paranoid fears of the u.n. that are devoid of any fact whatsoever. so one could understand harry reid's frustration in trying to negotiate with republicans when he vented, and i quote, it's difficult to engage in rational negotiation when one side holds well-known facts and proven truths in such low esteem. senator reid is spot on or more on what it means for the disabilities community i'm met with the ceo how shocked are you that it could not be ratified by the united states senate. >> when it comes down to it, i was floored. there is no reason in this day and age when a treaty that is focused on a quality for people with disabilities abroad can't pass the u.s. senate. it was really ridiculous and ultimately a sad day for america that we couldn't get it through. this treaty would have
right now. thank you. host: thank you. we could get that information as well. bob, mich. on the independent line. good morning to you. bob are you there? i think we lost bob this morning. i want to talk with this issue of age discrimination and who is on unemployment insurance. here is an article from "the baltimore sun." 93,000 young adults in maryland are unemployed. what ages are on unemployment insurance at this point? guest: historical you tend to see younger workers with less experience on unemployment, because of this recession we see a much wider spread. more people with college degrees, older people taking on income and benefits of some kind, but the challenges once you get past the six-month blocked, the longer you are on unemployment without a job, the harder it is to find a job. if you have a college degree, and you really need to get a job, to some degree you can move down the economic ladder. you might not want to, it might not be positive for society, but when you do? pg when you do that, it pushes someone -- but when you do that, it pushes someone else fu
children to sweat shop work day? >> anyway, let's check with bob pisani with more on what's moving today. >> let's talk about what the trading day's going to look like. that was the main topic of conversation overnight and through this morning. i would note, folks, i know this is not a good open, but we are well above where we were at the close last friday. so we were 1413 last friday at the close, 1427 now. i think on the s&p 500. okay. it's a bad day, a down day, but we're still actually above where we were at the close last year. we're up for the week on the s&p 500. i think the problem now is going to be talking about what the rest of the day's going to look like. my sense talking to everybody is, they'll try to sell at most of the rallies that go on, just to protect themselves for what we've been seeing here. that's going to be a problem. because i know you're hopeful maybe we'll get a move up toward the close. i think selling into the rallies is going to be a general problem. i specifically was talking to people about that today. we've been rallying. the biggest problem that we hav
? who would have thought? i did. we did, bob. we did. got it. >>> back to "hardball." in the "sideshow," a protest takes a turn for the better. it started out when ohio senator rob portman took to a stage at a fix the debt conference in washington today. a group of protesters pre-empted portman's speech with a staged walkout and a chant about republican plans to cut spending. it was caught on camera by buzz feed. >> we're gonna grow, not slow, the economy. we're gonna grow, not slow, the economy. we're gonna grow, not slow, the economy. we're gonna grow, not slow, the economy. >> but here is how the episode ended. there you see senator portman with four of the protesters after his speech. well, according to buzz feed, portman and those four protesters, all ohio residents, had an impromptu meeting after his speech ended. it lasted about 20 minutes and concluded with that group photo. i guess that's one way to be a politician and a protester. get the guy's attention, he gets their attention, they meet, you have a meeting, something gets done. >>> also, why is sarah palin apologizing to f
: it was voted down three consecutive times. host: here's an e-mail from bob and florida. making the economic argument against right-to-work state. and then there are people who have an economic argument on the other side of it. if we read a piece earlier in the washington post on what right-to-work states due to the broader economy. -- due to the state's economy? and now this isn't egypt. on the front page of the washington post, amid this turmoil, aid for egypt is on its way. the u.s. and a coalition of international lenders are pushing ahead with billions of dollars of loans and other help for egypt and neighboring states. so, money going to the country despite the violence there. and on the domestic front, the richmond times dispatch, courtesy of the newseum, health care law includes from a surprising $60 coverage free. bob in rapid city, south dakota, republican caller. caller: whee are a right-to- work state. in the past week we had an article in the newspaper that we are 16th in the nation in income. we averaged 44,000. where is the nation averages 41,000. so it's just not true that a
's a question, though, willie, whether you want the job or not. >> right. >> i asked bob riley, i've said this 1,000 times, it seems extraordinarily important if you're a union member in the northeast, and like me, you want your factories running again. i asked bob riley, i don't understand, why did mercedes go to tuscaloosa county, alabama, instead of filling up the factories in connecticut? 15 minutes away from yale. or in rhode island. 20 minutes away from brown. i mean, right by some of the most highly trained, brilliant minds in the world. that's easy. the work force rules are so insane there, there's no way that mercedes or bmw or airbus would ever dream of going to those states. do you want the jobs or do you not want the jobs? >> and that plays out all over the south in harold's home state of tennessee, auto plant comes back, you get a bunch of jobs but at a very low wage. so the question is do you want to lower ourselves to the global standard of wages so that you have many more jobs -- >> that's a better option. >> that question has to be answered -- >> stronger middle class in union s
member the president said in a debate, the debate, he said that i didn't come up with this. then bob woodward came out and said, yes, you did. you know, both a top aide said that you guys came up with this idea of the white house. look in the mirror, right. >> that's exactly right. a lot of people on wall street and in the media are saying just don't do it, don't go over the cliff. you know, and then that shows a we that we still have a 16 trillion-dollar national debt. so when the world are we going to get serious about what the american people say they want, which is reduction in the debt so that we don't become a country that looks like greece. [talking over each other] gregg: capitol hill and pennsylvania avenue, maybe they just think 16 trillion, 25 trillion, who cares. maybe they don't think it has a depressive effect on economic growth, and soaking up the credit markets, which women's businesses. >> that's exactly right. we don't have to wonder what this will go by. all we have to do is look over the pond and see what's happening in countries like greece and italy and spain an
was senator bob corker. here is what he had to say. [video clip] >> realizing that we do not have a lot of cards when it comes to the tax issue before the end of the year. it will leave the presidency and the senate in the hands of the democrats. many people are putting forward a theory that has merit where you go against the president with a 2% increase on the top 2%. all of a sudden the shift goes back to entitlements. all of a sudden once you give him that tax rate, lesser that what he has been talking about, the focus shifts to entitlements and puts us in a place where we can actually do something to save this nation. i am actually beginning to believe that that is the best route for us to take. host: senator corker, saying that there are more republicans willing to do that. you heard him lay out the strategy there. lots of debate in washington about who should give and how much. we are asking you to weigh in on that conversation and tell us what you are willing to sacrifice. this comes from a piece from a few days ago, from "national journal magazine." it is about americans not wil
hagel is the president's top pick for defense secretary. and that -- that would be replacing bob gates. that would have left senator john kerry out of luck because u.n. ambassador susan rice was in line for the state department post. and then this bombshell... >> good day. we're coming on the air right now to break exclusive word that the united states ambassador to the united nations ambassador susan rice, has transmitted word to the president of the united states that she is withdrawing her own name from any future consideration for nomination to become perhaps the next secretary of state. >> jennifer: wow! and then president obama in response to her letter, released a statement saying... >> jennifer: he is, of course, referring to the relentless attacks from republicans who suggested that she purposely misled the country about the benghazi attack that killed ambassador christopher stevens. joining me now is bill press. he's most of current tv's "full court press." he's author of "the obama hate machine." the lies,
the tremendous service and career of bob morton. a 22-year veteran of the washington state legislature who recently announced that he was going to be retiring at the end of the year. he was first elected to the house in 1990 and then he was appointed to the senate where he currently represents the seventh district, including stevens, and parts of spokane county. he owned a small logging business and ran cattle while also preaching at his local church and serving the community. but bob is not just an outstanding legislator for eastern washington, he's also a close friend. a mentor and the reason that i got into politics and public service in the first place. as an elected official i've worked with him on countless issues and his advice and friendship has been invaluable. he's recognized for his leadership and knowledge, good forest management, no one knows western water law better than bob and he's participated in most of the negotiations over washington water law. bob and his wife linda have five children, 11 grandchildren and i know they're looking forward to spending more time with them
?margin. don't be modest, bob. you found a better way to pack a bowling ball. that was ups. and who called ups? you did, bob. i just asked question. it takes a long time to pack a bowling ball. the last guy pitched more ball packers. but you... you consulted ups. you found a better way. that's logistics. that's margin. find out what else ups knows. i'll do that. you're on a roll. that's funny. i wasn't being funny, bob. i know. ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] everyone deserves the gift of all day pain relief. this season, discover aleve. all day pain relief with just two pills. with odor free aspercreme. powerful medicine relieves pain fast, with no odor. so all you notice is relief. aspercreme. . >>> as promised let's take a look at the rest of the top ten most intriguing people you selected for 2012. here's again, brooke baldwin. >> reporter: number five, super jumper felix baumgartner. let's face it, he did what no human has ever done, diving 24 miles from the edge of space. >> under way. >> breaking the sound barrier along the way. >> i'm still the same guy. but as soon as you start traveling p
that wasn't a fun time. >> not like in a room having a cocktail. >> dave: how about republican bob corker who talked to greta about the spending cuts that they would like to see from the democrats thus far not on the table. it's a shame in this nation where every developed country in the world knows our fiscal cliff is our fiscal solvency you have to have these leverage points. sit down and solve the problem because we know it's our greatest threat. that's not the case here. we have a president who has not laid out a plan. is he on yulingsly a spendaholic. >> dave: here is the problem for republicans though. if there is no deal out of the senate he will say okay i need an up or down vote on the $250,000 up or down mark. if republicans want to go on record to say no on that. that's going to be very politically dangerous for john boehner in the house. that's the bottom line. >> juliet: i know you are getting a lot of tweets. mine is like i blame, this i blame that guy. it's interesting to hear what you guys have to say about that first, let's go to peter doocy. what happens this weekend as
, bob. we should let our viewers know, they might recognize you, you were on "fox & friends" three times in the past couple of years. >> three times. >> alisyn: when you were talking about work to help vets you didn't share were you in the middle of a crisis. take us back to three years ago, were you in china and your wife called. christy called and said there had been an accident and first didn't think it would be that bad and word came in that it was very serious. and we arranged a series of conference calls with the doctors and at one point, the doctor said to me, i asked her, how, what she thought was going to happen she couldn't tell, she couldn't guarantee he would live another 15 minutes. at that point i asked both of my brothers to find a catholic priest to give bobby the last rites. >> alisyn: bobby, do you remember the accident? >> no, i don't. no recollection at all. >> alisyn: what's the first thing that you remember afterwards? >> first thing i remember afterwards was waking up in the hospital. >> alisyn: and of course, shocked that you knew that your life was forever change
issue bob dole was using against bill clinton. i think we've made progress in other areas. clearly environmentally. we have deniers of global warming. but we're reducing the amount of oil we import and use. there's progress in that regard. on the other hand, there's been some retrogregs in the recognition of two of the great accomplishments of america in the 20th century with social security and medicare. before those two, we didn't have the possibility for the average old person who wasn't wealthy to have a decent existence in retirement. we now that v that and i'm sorry to see that pulled back. there's also an international event. we have to recognize this. from 1940 to 1990, we had very heavily-armed, bad people threatening our existence as a society. we don't have that anymore. we have the thugs. they are not the communists. they don't threaten our very existence. we have an ability now, i believe, to reduce some of the resources and do more things at home. although there's an ideological barrier. >> i know you love the congress. tip o'neill once said the people are better now.
? >> it was exactly, bob costas said. i think he actually said on this network, that guns always make situations more dangerous and saying things like that is just factually incorrect. and there are 30,000 people possibly every year killed with a firearm and exactly like you said, mike, 2 1/2 million times a year, people use the the guns to prevent crime. so the reason is that firearms deterrent and we've seen the lowest crime rate in the country now, and gun ownership at the highest rate. 47% of american households report to have a gun and admit it and let the polesters know: accidental firearm mistakes are at their lowest in the history of this country. bob costas and the anti-gun people are spouting off incorrect things and you know-- >> and i've heard quite a few people say after his remarks, if belcher's girlfriend had a gun maybe she wouldn't be dead. good to see you. >> thanks, mike, thank you. >> mike: after the break here, then, 90-year-old statue has been hailed as a priceless piece of public art and now it may be moved because feminist groups say it may be offensive. that guy is standing
the gift of doing, in-store or online. well, if itmr. margin?margin. don't be modest, bob. you found a better way to pack a bowling ball. that was ups. and who called ups? you did, bob. i just asked a question. it takes a long time to pack a bowling ball. the last guy pitched more ball packers. but you... you consulted ups. you found a better way. that's logistics. that's margin. find out what else ups knows. i'll do that. you're on a roll. that's funny. i wasn't being funny, bob. i know. >>> santa's lap or a flu shot? oh, let's see the full photograph. flu shot. right? next up. all right. we have some mixed answers here. let's see. >> santa. >> santa's lap. all right. we have -- everyone seems certain that that's a flu shot. all right. let's have a look. yeah, that is a flu shot. all right. there's the face. there's the expression. and we say flu shot? all right. let's take a look. it is a -- oh, santa. >> welcome back to "morning joe." a beautiful shot of capitol hill. look at that. >> wow! >> red sky at morning. look at that. it's just gorgeous. gorgeous shot. it's a shame t.j. ca
that will be calculated, and quite frankly, in a more simplified form been standard tax law. host: professor bob kelly? guest: when i say chaos i am -- professor buckley? >> when i say chaos, i am referring to two things. the irs has done programming based on their being a patch enacted by the end of the year. most tax returns software has made the same calculated gamble. i agree that the government needs revenue. i do not think there is any question of that. if you just say that the amt is a good tax because it raises revenue, i do not argue on the notion that we need money, however is an extraordinarily arbitrary way of raising revenue. it raises revenue not from the super wealthy. the amt applies to few people making more than half of $1 million. it is counter-intuitive. if you are going to raise revenue, it should be as president obama has suggested, shared sacrifice, and that sacrifice has to come from people making more than half of $1 million. host: how do the very wealthy get out of paying the amt? guest: because of the rate structure. the rate between $200,000 and $500,000 are at least as hig
or the other. all they're trying to do is protect their interests. host: bob is in barrington, illinois on our republican line. caller: on the matter of immigration, i live in illinois. illegals are not allowed in the .tate to have driver's licenses what is going on with our country? we have the most corrupt politicians in the united states in this state. everyone knows what is going on. they are selling our state out to the illegals and i am upset with it. if somebody breaks in my house, i'm not going to give them a bed and roof over their head. i'm going to put them in jail or kick him out of the country. host: bob, does the illinois state department of motor vehicles rulebook still say, must read, write, understand english? caller: no, i have not seen it in there. the should have kept that in there. i was in japan for four years. their rules are a lot tougher hours. we had to carry id's around. -- around 24/7. host: what kind of work did you do in barrington, illinois? caller: i worked all over. if i want to find a part-time job, it is hard. the minute they look at her white hair, they say
a plant in chattanooga a few months ago, 2,000 new jobs. bob corcoran was down there. 2,000 jobs, every one of which started at $14.50 an hour. >> right. they're not all going to be at -- >> so volkswagen was moving these jobs here because we're the low wage country compared to germany. >> dude, are you suggesting we push these jobs away? >> i'm not. >> i would rather americans have a shot at a $17 an hour job than having it in china. >> i agree. >> find a way to do better. i actually agree with you. but you have to understand the consequences are pretty severe for american lifestyles. >> again, though, i'm sorry, mike, but the consequences are, we have two choices, we can't get 1965 wages, we either have these jobs in china or lexington, either have them in alabama or germany and this is at least for some of -- a chance for younger americans to get some good jobs. >> joe, if you're taking a job that pays $14.50 an hour. it means one of two things, a, you don't have a job so you're getting a job or b, you're taking a job that's higher paying job. come on, this is good news! 1 $14. $14.5
with their presence. there's usually two or three of them i see. host: moving on to bob in pennsylvania. bob, how long have you been with the n.r.a.? caller: a long time. host: 10-20 years? caller: 15 years. what kind of guns do you own? caller: guns, shotguns, pistols, and i do own an a.r.-15. host: what do you think about mr. lapierre? caller: i was disappointed. i was anxious to hear the news conference and hopeful n.r.a. would come out with a reasonable response and want to lead in the middle. i believe that it's a good idea to have armed edwards in school. -- armed guards in school. the n.r.a. said they would train these people with an unlimited budget. but they stop way short of -- yes, video games and violence in our society, kids playing on these video games and the movies and the music. when i was young, we were not allowed to watch "the untouchables," eliot with robert because my parents thought it was too violent. my parents thought. and now we've come to this. there's no reason these guns should be available for sale. they have no place in the sporting arena or no place in the hunting aren
ball. that was ups. and who called ups? you did, bob. i just asked a question. it takes a long time to pack a bowling ball. the last guy pitched more ball packers. but you... you consulted ups. you found a better way. that's logistics. that's margin. find out what else ups knows. i'll do that. you're on a roll. that's funny. i wasn't being funny, bob. i know. meet the 5-passenger ford c-max hybrid. when you're carrying a lot of weight, c-max has a nice little trait, you see, c-max helps you load your freight, with its foot-activated lift gate. but that's not all you'll see, cause c-max also beats prius v, with better mpg. say hi to the all-new 47 combined mpg c-max hybrid. >>> it was a crime that made headlines across the country in 199, it was all the rage in new york city, the 28-year-old white wall street investment banker jogging through central park when she was brutally assaulted, rained, left for dead. she was in a coma. five black and latino teenagers were arrested and convicted, they became known as the central park five. they spent between 6 and 13 years in prison, until a
mark bob john and david and the entire family most of which is with us here in the gallery today. their strength and sacrifices have been indispensable to my public service. i am also very much indebted to a great number of talented and loyal friends who have served with me in the senate including by my count, more than 300 senators hundreds of personal and committee staff members and more than a thousand students in turns. in my experience it is difficult to conceive of a better platform from which to devote oneself to public service and the search for solutions to national and international problems. at its best the senate is one of the founders most important creations. a great deal has been written recently about political discord in the united states. some commentators judging that partisanship is at an all-time high. having seen quite a few times in the congress when political struggles were portrayed in this way i hesitate to describe our current state as of the most partisan ever but i do believe that as an
in the oregon massacre again at the hands of a gun and a perpetrator that is now dead and to say i thank bob costa for having the courage to get on national tv and speak to those who are rabid sports fans and say it's time for some form of gun regulation. the tragedy that occurred with the nfl player and his girlfriend speaks volumes to the idea of individuals who don't need to have guns in their hands. this phenomenon that guns don't kill, people do, is a trite and redundant and a ridiculous statement. we understand that guns have to have someone at their -- at their trigger, but the idea is with no regulations about those who had previous offenses, no regulations dealing with those who've had mental health issues, no regulations for the gun show loophole that you can go in and buy guns on top of guns, it is time to reflect and i think the sports committee could work with us to assure that america realizes there's nothing wrong withstanding up for gun regulation. let me offer sympathy to the brent and brown families to the nfl family and those concerned about athlete in pro ball, that we c
by reaching hosted by bob casey. senator bob casey of hearing. >> the committee will come to order. we want to thank everyone for being here today. i did not have a chance to personally greet our witnesses, but i will have time to do that later. i want to thank both of our witnesses for being here. i will have an opening statement that i will make, and then i will turn it to dr. burgess. i know that vice chairman brady will be her as well. we know the challenges that we confront here in congress on a whole range of issues, which are sometimes broadly described under the umbrella of the terminology, fiscal cliff. when we confront those difficult challenges, we have to ask ourselves a couple of basic questions. one of the basic questions we must ask is, what will be the result and will be the impact as it relates to middle income families? what will happen to them in the midst of all these tough issues we have to work out? we know there is broad agreement that going over the so-called fiscal cliff would jeopardize the economic recovery. it would do that by increasing taxes on families, haltin
. the have to find common ground. host: bob is on the line from chapel hill, north carolina. caller: two specific questions. does your trillion dollar increase come from status scoring versus dynamic scoring? there is some growth that comes out of the base broadening. on social security, do you adjust the inflation annually? lastly, a little history. i know the set was trying to do something with the commission in 2008-2009. they fail to pass it. -ba- -- they failed to pass it. the hypocrisy did not go both ways. i think history would help people understand the importance of simpson-bowles. guest: you're absolutely right. there have been several proposals. they are creating a commission that have the authority to come up with a plan. this was a bipartisan bill that was in the senate. it failed. the alternative was the aha president by executive order established simpson-bowles. the leadership in congress soft agreed that if simpson-bowles got 14 members to vote yes then the recommendations would be put up for consideration and some sort of expedited fashion. it became a non issue. the pr
, so many who wanted to speak. but i want to say to you what i said bob wright of autism speech earlier today. i think you for caring about somebody other than your children and ourselves. because what you're doing here today is raising this issue so that other children, other than those that may be in your own family, maybe your friends, will benefit in the future. you're touching the future and you're making it possible for those who are going through the optimism -- the hottest inspector disorders to have a better future. so -- the autism spectrin disorders to have a better future. so i urge you to stay the course. one thing i have learned in 17 years is that, in order for these causes to move forward, you have to keep banging the drum. and you must bang it louder and louder in presenting your case so that, after it is all over, as my mother would say, motion, commotion, emotion and no results. i want you to be successful in what you're doing. life is short. so we must try to use our energy so that we can get the best possible results. i am so glad the chairman said what he said abou
we are heading in the same direction. thank you and have a wonderful new year. host: a tear from bob now in the democrat light. caller: thank you for letting me have a chance to speak. i am more optimistic -- i a more pessimistic than optimistic. i just do not think they will ever get together like they should. my one comment is when they start speaking about the cuts and the entitlements, the always a social security, medicare, medicaid. that is not the only entitlements. every government program that has a retirement benefit, a health-care benefit, those are entitlements, two, up to and including the entitlements for the congressman. let's be fair. when they start talking about entitlements and hold it to those three items, let's hold their feet to the fire and make them talk about entitlements for the other folks, too. host: appreciate you calling this morning. donna writes about this on twitter. if that to facebook here. -- back to you facebook here. budget showdown hits the keep week. that is of the front page reminding us of the deadline looming. it is a bloomberg story here ou
take responsibility for it. i can remember bob michael former republican leader in the house saying i'm proud of voting for this. if you want a two bit congressman vote for somebody else. he kept getting reelected. host: john now on the democratic line. caller: good morning. thanks for having me on. my main thing is saying i think the problem is our g.d.p. we don't produce anything. we don't create any jobs. as far as china is concerned, we don't tariff, we don't put that high of a tariff on their imports but yet i don't know the exact numbers but i believe it's a lot higher that they tax our imports in their country. and the whole thing with jobs. he created the apple scommuret in california in his garage but yet when he got successful he moves all his company over to china, giving chinese people jobs. if steve jobs was born in china he wouldn't even have a garage therefore he wouldn't be able to create the apple computer. so i just think we just don't do enough for the people of this country. and the people who are in position to create jobs and do this do not reinvest in the countr
minded enough, clear-eyed enough about the russian. bob gates also, who moved over to national security. that little group kind of delayed the process i would say for about six months. the people let state i think were ready to kind of progress, you know, with what had been achieved toward the end of the second reagan administration. but it just really delayed things, because the person who turned that around, and he also deserves a great deal of credit, was jim baker. jim baker did a great job putting together kind of an inter-agency management for this process and the different players and he spent a good deal of time, i would say a year and a half or two years, arrived in moscow with an entourage with the negotiators from cfd of the relevant assistant secretaries. broke them into working groups and i think that process that ros participated in with schivinovski and gorbachev but there was a delay and i don't think it set us back. i don't think there were any problems as a result of that. >> thank you. >> i was just going to say that james baker was named secretary of state the day af
.r.s., these are the numbers. since 1985, senator bob dole filled the tree -- used the gag rule -- seven times. senator byrd used it three times. senator mitchell used it three times. senator lott, when he was majority leader, used the gag rule 11 times. that is, cut off amendments. senator daschle only one time. senator frist, 15 times sm. those are the majority leaders. since 1985, awful those majority leaders -- all of those majority leaders used it a combined 40 times. our current majority leader, senator reid, has used it, as of yesterday, 69 times since he became leader in 2007. this trend, this gagging of the minority, is the primary cause of the senate's dysfunction. so, madam president, i wanted to correct the record. made a mistake and i'm glad to come. i don't want senator dole get the credit for that when senator byrd actually figured it out of and i want to leave a more -- i want to leave an optimistic -- i want to conclude with an optimistic point. i think most of us -- and i would include the distinguished senator from new hampshire in the chair because we've been together in discussions, bip
's check with mary thompson, on the floor in for bob pisani today. >> weakness across the board. weakness in the nasdaq, down about 20 points. the dow lost in early trade. a little more modest in the s&p, down 4.25%. traders saying the fiscal cliff headlines will continue to dictate trading. and here there was a little reaction in the futures market ahead of today's opening bell on the data and the better than expected production numbers. overseas, last night we did have some more bad news out of japan with business sentiment there weakening. as melissa was mentioning earlier, positive news on the manufacturing front in china. that's giving a lift, as she pointed out, to a number of mining stocks. while it's also giving a lift to energy, or to oil prices this morning, i should point out, some of the big name oil companies were a little bit lower in early trading, again, those being exxon as well as chevron. the traders said the bid in the market remains strong despite concerns about the fiscal cliff in large part because the investors remain positive going into 2013. this is the markets r
other young men, a soldier from kansas named bob dole, and one from michigan named phil hart. they formed a lifelong bond, one that endiewrd all the way to the u.s. senate. in 2003 when we dedicated that
of the senate foreign relations committee for her work, senator bob menendez on the foreign relations committee. all those were very instrumental in dealing with this. senator durbin who has been a real champion on human rights. i want to acknowledge kyle parker, a staff person from the helsinki commission who was very instrumental in the development of this legislation, and i want to also acknowledge senator lieberman's work. i know he will be speaking in a few minutes. it was senator lieberman and senator mccain and myself that first suggested that we should pass the magnitsky bill, it's the right thing to do, but we certainly shouldn't let pntr go without attaching the magnitsky bill. i want to thank senator lieberman and thank senator mccain for raising that connection. it was the right thing to do. first of all, it allowed us to get this human rights tool enacted. secondly, i think it gave us the best chance to get the pntr bill done in the right form. so i want to thank both of them for their leadership on that. in 1974, we passed the jackson vanik law. it dealt with the failure of the so
'd like to thank bob rose. i can think of no better way to launch this initiative and with the speakers we have assembled here today. our panelists, michael mccaul, and mike rogers, chairman of the house permanent select committee on intelligence. white house cybersecurity coordinator howard schmidt and chairman and ceo of boston properties, editor in chief of "u.s. news and world report," owner and publisher of "the new york daily news." our first speaker is michael chertoff. it would be difficult to imagine anyone better suited to head the cybersecurity initiative than secretary chertoff. as secretary of homeland security from 2005 until 2009, he was responsible for implementing immigration policy, homeland security regulation, and spearheading a national cybersecurity effort. from 2003 until 2005, he served as a federal judge at the u.s. court of appeals for the third circuit. from 2001 until 2003, he was an assistant attorney general of the u.s. as chairman of the board of directors of bae systems, he is an advocate for cybersecurity and the private sector. please welcome secretary mic
. david herring, kent hall, who died on timely death working for me, care are garland, bob vanhuevland, wally, my legislative director who was with me for more than 20 years, tom mar, jerry gaginas, we all fondly call "mom," because she cracks the whip and makes sure the trains run on time. mary naylor, also has been with me more than 20 years. my deputies there, john rider and joel friedman, who have done extraordinary work on behalf of the people of this country. stew nagerka, who is going to help me with charts today, my longtime communication communics director, and so many more. and most  of all to my family, my wife lucy, who has been my partner through all this, was my campaign manager when i first ran for the united states senate, my daughter jessie, who in in many ways has perhaps sacrificed the most because when you're in this job, you miss birthdays, you miss other important events. but she has been a great daughter, and she was here last night for our farewell party. and we had a lovely time. our son, ivan, and his wife kendra, who are in oregon where they have a small far
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